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12-05-2021 15:35

Grootste wijndrinkers

 

Tot heden hebben de Verenigde Staten het meeste wijn geconsumeerd. Direct gevolgd door Frankrijk en Italië, die ook het meeste produceren. De OIV kwam met het volgende lijstje:

 

 

 

De Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV) kwam op de recente persconferentie in Parijs met het volgende lijstje:

 

Top 10 by consumption, per OIV.

1.US – 33mhl

2. France – 24.7mhl

3. Italy – 24.5mhl

4. Germany – 19.8mhl

5. UK – 13.3mhl

6. China – 12.4mhl

7. Russia – 10.3mhl

8. Spain – 9.6mhl

9. Argentina – 9.4mhl

10. Australia – 5.7mhl

It’s also worth noting that on a per capita basis, the top 10 would likely look rather different.

 

Portugese on top

Which country drinks the most wine per person?

On a per capita basis, the leaderboard would look quite different.

A chart shared by the American Association of Wine Economists (AAWE) on Twitter earlier this year presented the average litres of wine drunk per person (aged over 15 years) in 2018.

Portugal topped the charts, on 62.1 litres per person on average, closely followed by Luxembourg on 55.5 litres.

France and Italy came in at 50.2 and 43.7 litres, with the UK back at 22.6 litres and the US coming in at 12.4 litres.

Things have changed a lot in the last few decades, too.

Another chart publicised by AAWE shows how French wine consumption has roughly halved on a per capita basis in the last 50 years, having already been declining before 1970.

That chart is from the recently updated ‘annual database of global wine markets, 1835-2018’, made freely available by the University of Adelaide’s Wine Economics Research Centre.

Italy, too, has seen consumption drop from around 100 litres per person in 1970, show the figures compiled by emeritus professor Kym Anderson and economic history professor Vicente Pinilla (with the assistance of A.J. Holmes), of the University of Adelaide and University of Zaragoza respectively.