Vertaal/translate

Dutch English French German Italian Portuguese Russian Spanish

We hebben 75 gasten en geen leden online

Unieke bezoekers

5641500
Vandaag
Gisteren
Deze week
Vorige week
Deze maand
Vorige maand
Alles vanaf 22 maart 2012
376
1674
10633
11345
31827
0
5641500

Uw IP: 3.92.74.105
20-09-2020 06:26

Duurste witte Bourgogne

Wat zijn op dit moment de duurste witte Bourgognes. Dat laat Wine Searcher op de eigen website zien. Uit deze wijnregio komen ‘s werelds beste Chardonnays, en ras dat de laatste jaren nogal is verguisd. Doordat er allerlei versies van op de markt kwamen waaraan kwaliteit ontbrak. Ook werd teveel toegegeven aan modieuze smaakgolven. In de Bourgogne handhaafden wijnmakers hun eigen stijl en niveau. Maar dat had ook een prijs. Don Kavanagh schrijft:

 

 

‘It's funny that whenever wine writers talk about how Chardonnay is on the way out, they never mention Burgundy.

The myth that somehow Chardonnay is being overtaken in popularity by other varieties is a common trope among many commentators, despite the fact that Chardonnay remains comfortably the most popular white wine on earth.

The vast bulk of the Chardonnay glugged down by the masses tends to be supermarket-style wine (slightly subdued so as not to frighten the horses, but with enough toasty oak and buttery malo character to keep it recognizably Chardonnay); but where Chardonnay really made its name is in Burgundy.

Burgundy price rises are slowing down, but only in the short term. Viewed across the medium to long term, they have mushroomed in cost – double-digit annual increases have been the norm for the past five years or so, but the steam appears to be running out of what was undoubtedly an overheated market.

Apart from the Leflaive, they are the only wines that have increased in value in the past 12 months. The Corton Charlemagne only rose by 0.8 percent, but the rest were more substantial: the d'Auvenay Bâtard-Montrachet went up by 6.8 percent, the Chevalier-Montrachet by 12 percent, the Criots-Bâtard-Montrachet by 13 percent, and the Puligny and Gouttes d'Or by a whopping 39 and 41 percent, respectively.

The Leflaive rose by 2.8 percent, but the rest fell in average price. The DRC was down by 1.3 percent, the Coche-Dury by 4.6 percent and the Ramonet by 11.4 percent. The shakeout is that the average price for top 10 rose quite considerably compared to last year – from an average of $4570 a bottle to $5812, a jump of 27 percent, but that was almost entirely driven by Leroy wines’.